10 Christmas songs written by Jews

by | Dec 2, 2016 | Entertainment, Hillel Ontario | 0 comments

Jews tend to believe that Christmas has a big impact on the Jewish culture. However, most people are not aware how much Jews influence Christmas!

Here is a list of our favorite Christmas songs you didn’t know were written by Jews:

1. Winter Wonderland – Felix Bernard, Richard B. Smith

We all know the Christmas jingle ‘Winter Wonderland’ performed by Michael Bubblé, Dean Martin, Amy Grant, and many other amazing singers. What most people don’t know is that one of the co-writers, Felix Bernard, is in fact Jewish.
Felix Bernard was born in New York, and was a successful conductor, pianist, and composer. Amongst his most popular works are ‘Winter Wonderland’ and ‘Dardanella’.

 

2.Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas – Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin

Ralph Blane, who was an amazing composer, co-wrote one of the most famous Christmas carols, which was part of a film musical from 1944, called ‘Meet Me In St. Louis’. Since then ‘Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas’ was featured in movies, such as Die Hard, The Gremlins, The Nightmare Before Christmas, and many more.

 

3. Santa Clause Is Coming To TownFred Coots, Haven Gillespie 

Fred Coots, the co-writer of this Christmas hit, was another successful Jew, who impacted Christmas. He composed more than 12 Broadway shows and over 700 songs. After his co-writer came up with the lyrics to ‘Santa Clause Is Coming To Town’, it only took Coots 10 minutes to compose the skeleton of this world famous Christmas carol.

 

4. Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It SnowSammy Cahn, Jule Styne 

Both writers of this Christmas classic are Jewish. Sammy Cahn, born Samuel Cohen, and Jule Styne, born Julius Stein wrote ‘Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow!’ 1945. The composers do not only have this hit in common. Both Jewish family were originally from in Eastern Europe, and immigrated to the United States when their children were still young.

 

5.It’s The Most Wonderful time Of The Year – Edward Pola, George Wyle

We all know this song from Ellen DeGeneres’ segment of ’12 Days Of Giveaways’, but have you ever thought about the people who wrote this jingle? One of the co-writers is Edward Pola. Edward Pola was an actor, radio- and TV producer, and a songwriter. He was born in New York to his Jewish parents who immigrated to the US from Hungary.

 

6.Do you know it’s Christmas? – Midge Ure, Bob Geldof (Performed by Band Aid)

Do you know it’s Christmas, which is one of the best-selling singles of all time, was co-written by the singer, songwriter, author and political activist Bob Geldof. Geldof was born and grew up in Ireland with a Jewish grandfather.

 

7.Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer – Johnny Marks

Johnny Marks is famous for his many Christmas songs, including ‘Rocking Around the Christmas Tree’, ‘A Holly Jolly Christmas’, and ‘Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer’. Many of his Christmas works ended up being great hits. What most people don’t know about the American songwriter is that he was in fact a Jew from New York.

 

8.Sleigh Ride – Leroy Anderson, Mitchell Parish

The co-writer of Sleigh Ride, Mitchel Parish was born in Lithuania and immigrated with his Jewish family to the US at the age of one. The successful New York lyricist wrote, and translated songs to English. One of his works is the famous Christmas song ‘Sleigh Ride’.

 

9.White Christmas – Irving Berlin

The composer and lyricist of White Christmas, Irving Berlin, is considered one of the greatest song writers in American history. His father was a cantor in a synagogue in Imperial Russia until the Jewish family immigrated to the United States and moved to New York. There, Irving Berlin grew up and became a very successful composer and lyricist, writing and composing world famous songs and film scores.

 

10 . Channukah Songs – Adam Sandler

Last, but for sure not least, we will go back to Channukah. Adam Sandler is known for his funny Channukah songs. In collaboration with Saturday Night Life writers Lewis Morton and Ian Maxton-Graham, Adam Sandler published a total of four Channukah songs. Each of the songs wishes the listener a Happy Channukah, and lists all possible public figures who are Jewish.

In Adam Sandler’s words: Everyone at Hillel Ontario wishes you a happy, happy, happy, happy Channukah!

Nature vs. Nurture, and Nate Deserves Our Anger

Nature vs. Nurture, and Nate Deserves Our Anger

Weekly D’var: Toldot 5782 by Scott Goldstein

[Warning: Ted Lasso show spoiler] I just finished watching the second season of Ted Lasso, and I cannot get the image of the finale out of my head. Haven’t seen it yet? That’s ok, I’ll recap part of this week’s Torah portion as you go catch up and then tie it in at the end for when you get back.

When not detailing the intricate politics of well-digging and water rights, this week’s Torah portion takes some time to highlight our favourite biblical twins – Jacob and Esav (a.k.a. Esau). Some may even refer to this as the first twin study on “Nature vs. Nurture” (shoutout to my psychology peeps) ever recorded. We are presented with brothers that were raised in the same environment but turned out to be polar opposites. I’ll let you read the riveting stories of birthright transactions and elaborate deceptions on your own, but the narrative we are presented with is clear: Jacob is good, and Esav is bad. Here’s the problem I had with this narrative: If Esav was raised in a good environment, but still did bad things, then is the Torah telling us that our destiny is sealed by nature?

I just finished watching Ted Lasso, and I cannot help but think about how loveable Nate (played by Nick Mohammed) is a perfect example of what I think our Torah portion is trying to tell us. Ted Lasso (played masterfully by Jason Sudeikis) created a nurturing environment where Nate could grow from invisible kit manager to assistant coach that everyone loves. Despite all that, it comes down to the decisions Nate made to allow jealousy to influence his actions, leading him to leave Richmond FC and betray his teammates by joining West Ham United.

I think the story we read in the Torah is reminding us that both nature and nurture are really important (just as science does), but our decisions, ultimately, are our own. Whether it’s Esav going down in history as the ultimate example of bad decision-making or Nate likely being the reason we see Ted cry next season, the lesson is clear… be like Jacob because we can make good decisions no matter the circumstances.

Hillel International Student Cabinet 2021-2022

Hillel International Student Cabinet 2021-2022

Jordan Goldenberg, Ryerson University ‘23 and Leah Goldschmidt, York University ‘22, are representing Canadian Jewish students on Hillel International’s global stage. Here’s how they’re enhancing the Canadian Jewish campus experience for years to come:

This year I was fortunate enough to be selected to participate on  the Hillel International Student Cabinet, as one of two Canadian representatives. I am honoured to join the board of  22 students from the United States of America, Israel, Russia and Brazil. 

Over the years, I have been very active in Hillel at York University, and was thrilled when Hillel York’s staff approached me about the opportunity to bring my enthusiasm and passion for Hillel on an international scale. 

Hillel has always been a safe space for me — somewhere I could go to feel comfortable about my Jewish identity, but also a place where I could meet other Jews on campus; some who have become my best friends. Although I only recently joined the Student Cabinet, I can genuinely say I have met some of the most incredible students and staff who are so passionate about the Hillel movement.

I am constantly amazed by the work Hillel students are doing around the world to support and connect the next generation of our community.. We have members who have founded their own Hillels at colleges with barely any Jews, members who are advocates for the LGBTQ+ community and have launched successful international LGBTQ+ cohorts, and members who are doing tremendous work in combating antisemitism. Being around such passionate and motivating students has inspired me to go after my own aspirations within Hillel; creating space for Jews with disabilities. 

As a student with a disability, I am very passionate about expanding space for Jews with disabilities, and while Hillel has taken great strides to increase accessibility and inclusivity; there’s lots more we can do. Hillel has given me incredible resources and support to launch my own projects within this space.

I am thrilled to be representing Canada in this incredible opportunity, and am looking forward to the year ahead.

Leah Goldschmidt, Hillel York

My name is Jordan Goldenberg, and I am a third-year student at Ryerson University studying business management. I am also the President of Hillel Ryerson. The Cabinet is made up of students from around the world, working towards the common goal of engaging Jewish university and college students worldwide. The role of the Cabinet is to serve as a voice for Jewish students and a means of connection to the worldwide Hillel movement. Being part of the collective voice means everything to me, and I am excited to be that voice for Jewish students amplifying Canada and Hillel Ontario’s role on the global stage. 

At the beginning of October,  I had the opportunity to go to DC with the Hillel International Student Cabinet. It was an incredible experience to collaborate with and learn from a variety of leaders in the Jewish community and the Hillel movement. I learned so much from our two student co-chairs, fellow cabinet members and Hillel professionals. We had the chance to get to know the greater Hillel movement through meetings with staff members from various departments and positions within Hillel International; including, but not limited to, the communications teams, board members, the CEO, Adam Lehman, and many more. We spoke at great lengths about the role each of our local Hillels play on our campuses and what we can learn from one another. Since the summit, we have already hit the ground running, with many students taking on various projects at both the local and international levels. I learned so much about the global Hillel movement and how to be a better leader for Jewish students on campus and in the community.

I have always been passionate about bringing people together and there is no better way to do so than collaborating with Jewish students and Hillel’s internationally. This international collaboration allows us to share our common values while celebrating our differences in order to create the best Hillel atmosphere and programming possible.

Jordan Goldenberg, Hillel Ryerson

 

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