2018 Summer Opportunities

by | Feb 7, 2018 | Hillel Ontario, Job Posting, Opportunities | 0 comments

You have no plans for the upcoming summer? Here are different opportunities available to you!

 

Ontario Government Relations and Public Affairs Assistant

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) is looking to hire an Ontario Government Relations and Public Affairs Assistant for 8 weeks during the summer. The student will work in the areas of provincial and municipal government relations, public affairs, and advocacy.  This person will help plan and execute projects/events, arrange and attend meetings with elected officials and Toronto’s Jewish social service agencies, prepare communications material; conduct online research as required; play a pivotal role in the shape and scope of advocacy activities that take place in the local community. In turn, this person will gain experience in the following areas: government relations, public affairs, community social services, community relations, program planning, working within a team setting, communications (written and verbal), and more. For more information or to apply email cosheroff@cija.ca.


 

Environmental Educator and Tzedakah Gardening Coordinator

Are you a full-time student?
Do you love environmental education, urban agriculture, and social justice?
If so, Shoresh hiring an Environmental Educator and Tzedakah Gardening Coordinator.

Apply today and spread the good word. For more info: http://shoresh.ca/hiring/

 


Amir Farm

Amir Farm is a Jewish-founded organization that helps summer camps run community gardens and farm programs at their camps. They are looking for college students and recent graduates from a diverse range of backgrounds to fill the following positions for the summer 2018:

Amir Farmer

Amir Farm Manager

To apply click here.


Tel Aviv University

Study abroad at TAU is a transformative experience in the perfect city for international students! Join us for a semester or a year in the cultural and economic heart of Israel. Study alongside students from all over the world, and take fascinating courses on topics from across TAU’s academic faculties. For more information click here.


Hebrew University

Consistently ranked one of the World’s Top 100 universities and Top 25 schools outside of the US, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites international students to Israel to experience the outstanding, first-class overseas study abroad programs offered at the Rothberg International School. Click here to find out more.


Israel Summer Bunisess Academy (ISBA)

An opportunity for undergrads to study and immerse themselves in the Israeli business environment. The ISBA offers course credit that will transfer back to a student’s home institution. For more information visit Israel Summer Business Academy (ISBA).


Onward Israel

Spend 2 months in Tel Aviv at an Internship of your choice. When you’re not interning, see parts of Israel you have never experienced before. For more information visit Onward Israel.


Magen David Adom

Magen David Adom offers hands-on first aid and emergency-care experience in Israel. The program begins with a week-long intensive first aid training course, followed by work alongside some of the medics and paramedics going out in ambulances and dealing with real-life situations. Want to learn more? Visit Magen David Adom! 


Marva

Have you always been curious to learn more about the IDF? Marva is your opportunity to experience the beauty and challenges of Israel through the eyes of the IDF. Applicants have to be highly motivated. To find out more click here.


JNF University (JNFU)

JNFU was developed for individuals on campus to offer programming and events, missions to Israel and forums with young Jewish leaders. If this sounds interesting to you find out more on their website!


2018 Community Leadership Program Summer Retreat (CLP) at the Shalom Hartman Institute

Our societies in America and in Israel are falling short of achieving our ethical aspirations. The demise of civil discourse, widespread cynicism about democratic principles, and misbehavior by flawed leaders are a few of the central symptoms of this gap between our professed values and our lived reality. How can Jewish values inform our conversation about the dilemmas posed by this widening gap? Click here for more information and to apply for a timely exploration of character development and ethical leadership in the Jewish tradition this summer.


Pardes Summer Programs 2018

Join the Summer 2018 Pardes Executive Learning Seminar on ‘War & Peace: The Challenges of Sovereignty’ (June 24-28, 2018). Recharge at Pardes in Israel for 5 days and immerse in luxurious learning, both inside and outside of the classroom, with the world-class Pardes Faculty. Find out more and book at pardes.org.il/executive.
You can also join us for a fabulous summer of immersive learning, with 2, 3 and 5-week options. Limited grants available for student leaders, young Jewish communal professionals, and others. Click here or contact haley@pardes.org for more information.


Summer Internship In Israel

Boost your career with a top quality internship program in Israel. Intern at one of the country’s best companies and organizations with Top Israel Interns. Stay for a semester, or just for the summer. Get trendy apartment accommodation in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv, career advancement programming, tours of the country and more. Scholarships of up to $4500 available!  http://www.topisraelinterns.com

You can find the list here:

https://jobmob.co.il/blog/internships-in-israel


 

Hillel Ontario’s Remarks at Canada’s National Summit on Antisemitism

Hillel Ontario’s Remarks at Canada’s National Summit on Antisemitism

Today, the Government of Canada held a National Summit on Antisemitism.

Convened by The Honourable Bardish Chagger, Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth, and The Honourable Irwin Cotler, Canada’s Special Envoy on Preserving Holocaust Remembrance and Combatting Antisemitism, today’s Summit sought to provide parliamentarians and policymakers a comprehensive understanding of antisemitism in Canada, and identify concrete steps to address the issues facing the Jewish community.

Below is the full transcript of Hillel Ontario’s testimony.

Good afternoon, 

My name is Jay Solomon, and I am the Chief Communications & Public Affairs Officer for Hillel Ontario. 

Supporting approximately 14,000 Jewish students at nine universities across the province, Hillel Ontario – now the largest Hillel in the world – empowers students to make an enduring commitment to Jewish life, learning, and Israel.

This spring, Israel and Hamas – labelled a terrorist group around the world, including in Canada – squared off in the largest military conflict the region has experienced in some years. For both Israelis and Palestinians, the fighting was painful and distressing. 

In the wake of these tensions, around the world, and certainly here in Canada, supporters of Israel have been subjected to vile and sometimes violent vitriol. And, even more concerning, Diaspora Jews have been attacked – verbally and physically, online and in person – simply for being Jewish and regardless of their feelings about or connection to Israel.

As an illustration, I thought I would share just a few recent examples of some of what Jewish students have been subjected to on campuses in Canada in the past few months. At Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, a student posted a video on social media mocking the stabbing of Israelis. Near Western University, in London, a Nazi flag appeared at an anti-Israel rally. At McMaster University in Hamilton, a Jewish student was bullied online for showing support to Israel. And, on the personal social media pages of countless Jewish students across the province, blue squares and other expressions of concern about antisemitism were peppered with comments condemning Israel, levelling personal attacks at the students who posted them, and, in some, threatening physical violence. 

And then there’s the issues posed by student unions and faculty associations who in many cases have replaced informed debate and well-meaning dialogue – the cornerstones of university education – with one-sided rhetoric condensed to 20 second videos and 140-character tweets in an attempt to boil hundreds of years of culture and history into soundbites that are inevitably biased and simplistic. As a recent example, a student group at Western University published incredibly offensive social media commentary calling on the University Student Council to eliminate “all pro-Zionist narrative” from the campus. Another illustrative example involves the President of the University of Toronto Faculty Association who is alleged to have spoken about an “entitled powerful Zionist minority” at a recent academic panel.

These, and other, recent examples of antisemitism are as disturbing as they are unacceptable. Year over year, the Jewish community is the most targeted religious minority for hate crimes in Canada. And, these recent incidents underscore the important efforts that lay ahead – work that must include critical education on antisemitism, and a renewed commitment to relationship-building based on shared values and experiences. 

What many in the Jewish community have known for some time, but have been reluctant to say out loud, has become entirely self-evident in the past several months. We have long since recognized that antisemitism exists on a broad continuum, ranging from those who are simply uninformed, to those who are misinformed, to those who are wilfully ignorant. 

But, there’s another category; and it is one that has been taboo to speak of in many circles for too long. 

The unpopular reality is that some of the world’s worst antisemites (who, it just so happens, are among Israel’s most virulent detractors) embrace this label with malice and intentionality. And it is this type of poisonous, malevolent antisemitism that has been on full display recently. 

As the largest affiliate of the global Jewish student movement, Hillel Ontario’s student leadership and campus professionals have been working around-the-clock to support students who have been shaken by a tsunami of antisemitism online and on campus. 

We have communicated directly with university presidents, provosts, and student union leaders to ensure Jewish students were protected, and that their rights would be respected. We lodged official student code of conduct complaints and filed police reports when Jewish students were targeted; reported countless antisemitic posts on social media; provided personalized pastoral counselling; compiled educational resources and offered learning opportunities for those wanting to learn more; and provided space for students to process their own feelings, emotions and perspectives.

But, the truth is, our efforts on campus alone are not enough. And, we need your help. 

We need our nation’s leaders to come together to forcefully, consistently, and unconditionally condemn antisemitism – in all its forms – and to take proactive steps to secure the safety and security of the Jewish community of Canada, today and for the years to come.

We need formalized learning opportunities across the educational sector – for teachers, professors, administrators, equity officers, student government leaders and those charged with securing and protecting the campus community – to ensure historical and modern perspectives on antisemitism’s manifestations, as well as ways to combat them, are entrenched in and integrated into diversity, equity and inclusion and anti-oppression programming. Education on the perils of antisemitism must become a natural part of DEI and anti-oppression efforts on university campuses.

As a society, we must publicly acknowledge the overlap between antisemitism and anti-Zionism, and recognize that, far too often, anti-Zionism is used as a convenient shield behind which antisemites stand. 

As advocates for the Jewish community, we know that it is acceptable to criticize Israeli policies, or voice legitimate concerns for the welfare of Palestinians. Like any other liberal democracy, Israel is not immune from legitimate criticism. 

But, we also know that fair-game critiques end when Jews are denied the universally held right to collective self-determination; when Jews are held collectively responsible for the actions of the Israeli government; when antisemitic tropes dating back centuries are used to target Jews and Jewish communal institutions; or when comparisons are drawn between Israel and the horrors of the Holocaust. 

We need Canadian leaders to stand with the overwhelming majority of Jewish Canadians in a definition of antisemitism that includes the delegitimization of the Jewish state. Like any other minority group, the Jewish community’s definition of our oppression should be defined by the majority of our community, not fringe elements within it or outside of it. 

We need our nation’s leaders to counter efforts to promote the divisive and discriminatory Boycott, Divestment & Sanctions campaign against Israel, and work to promote dialogue and relationship-building opportunities based upon shared values. 

On behalf of Hillel Ontario, our students, professional staff and lay leadership, I want to offer my sincere thanks to the Government of Canada for convening this National Summit on Antisemitism, and for inviting me to participate in today’s proceedings. 

In the days and weeks ahead, Hillel Ontario stands ready to support the important work that lies ahead; to work in conjunction with the federal, provincial and municipal governments, and with university leadership, to support Jewish students in the ongoing fight against antisemitism. 

Thank you.

A Hillel Summer: Keeping Spirits High

My name is Stacey Ianco and I am going into my third year at Ryerson’s Ted Rogers School of Management. Hillel has been my home away from home, and has helped me embrace my Jewish culture, enhance my Jewish identity, and meet new people.. 

This year has been like no other we have experienced. Throughout these challenging times, I have felt lucky to have remained connected with my fellow students – especially through my involvement in Hillel. 

Especially given the year we just experienced, Hillel has been vital to my Jewish campus life. That’s why I was so excited to hear that Hillel programming was going to continue during the summer.

Hillels Ryerson, York and UofT teamed up to create the Summer in the 6ix program, and I knew I wanted to participate. 

In addition to receiving some really cool swag, Summer in the 6ix connected me with activities and programming I

 could engage in alongside (virtually) other Jewish students across the GTA. We baked and decorated delicious sugar cookies over a Hillel Zoom meet, sharpened our knowledge and competed with other Hillel students in bi-weekly trivia games, and customized our Hillel t-shirts with tie-dye. In a summer characterized by distancing and separation, Hillel brought me closer to my community.

To be sure, this has been a difficult year for so many reasons. I am so appreciative of all that Hillel does for Jewish students across the province. Especially this year.

I will continue to be an active member of Hillel for all my years of university and the future. Hillel has given me the confidence I need to be a proud Jewish woman and has enhanced my university experience in many ways. 

I look forward to being able to create more special events to include and connect every Jewish student in Ontario for many years to come.

Stacey I., Hillel Ryerson Student Leader

X