2018 Summer Opportunities

by | Feb 7, 2018 | Hillel Ontario, Job Posting, Opportunities | 0 comments

You have no plans for the upcoming summer? Here are different opportunities available to you!

 

Ontario Government Relations and Public Affairs Assistant

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) is looking to hire an Ontario Government Relations and Public Affairs Assistant for 8 weeks during the summer. The student will work in the areas of provincial and municipal government relations, public affairs, and advocacy.  This person will help plan and execute projects/events, arrange and attend meetings with elected officials and Toronto’s Jewish social service agencies, prepare communications material; conduct online research as required; play a pivotal role in the shape and scope of advocacy activities that take place in the local community. In turn, this person will gain experience in the following areas: government relations, public affairs, community social services, community relations, program planning, working within a team setting, communications (written and verbal), and more. For more information or to apply email cosheroff@cija.ca.


 

Environmental Educator and Tzedakah Gardening Coordinator

Are you a full-time student?
Do you love environmental education, urban agriculture, and social justice?
If so, Shoresh hiring an Environmental Educator and Tzedakah Gardening Coordinator.

Apply today and spread the good word. For more info: http://shoresh.ca/hiring/

 


Amir Farm

Amir Farm is a Jewish-founded organization that helps summer camps run community gardens and farm programs at their camps. They are looking for college students and recent graduates from a diverse range of backgrounds to fill the following positions for the summer 2018:

Amir Farmer

Amir Farm Manager

To apply click here.


Tel Aviv University

Study abroad at TAU is a transformative experience in the perfect city for international students! Join us for a semester or a year in the cultural and economic heart of Israel. Study alongside students from all over the world, and take fascinating courses on topics from across TAU’s academic faculties. For more information click here.


Hebrew University

Consistently ranked one of the World’s Top 100 universities and Top 25 schools outside of the US, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites international students to Israel to experience the outstanding, first-class overseas study abroad programs offered at the Rothberg International School. Click here to find out more.


Israel Summer Bunisess Academy (ISBA)

An opportunity for undergrads to study and immerse themselves in the Israeli business environment. The ISBA offers course credit that will transfer back to a student’s home institution. For more information visit Israel Summer Business Academy (ISBA).


Onward Israel

Spend 2 months in Tel Aviv at an Internship of your choice. When you’re not interning, see parts of Israel you have never experienced before. For more information visit Onward Israel.


Magen David Adom

Magen David Adom offers hands-on first aid and emergency-care experience in Israel. The program begins with a week-long intensive first aid training course, followed by work alongside some of the medics and paramedics going out in ambulances and dealing with real-life situations. Want to learn more? Visit Magen David Adom! 


Marva

Have you always been curious to learn more about the IDF? Marva is your opportunity to experience the beauty and challenges of Israel through the eyes of the IDF. Applicants have to be highly motivated. To find out more click here.


JNF University (JNFU)

JNFU was developed for individuals on campus to offer programming and events, missions to Israel and forums with young Jewish leaders. If this sounds interesting to you find out more on their website!


2018 Community Leadership Program Summer Retreat (CLP) at the Shalom Hartman Institute

Our societies in America and in Israel are falling short of achieving our ethical aspirations. The demise of civil discourse, widespread cynicism about democratic principles, and misbehavior by flawed leaders are a few of the central symptoms of this gap between our professed values and our lived reality. How can Jewish values inform our conversation about the dilemmas posed by this widening gap? Click here for more information and to apply for a timely exploration of character development and ethical leadership in the Jewish tradition this summer.


Pardes Summer Programs 2018

Join the Summer 2018 Pardes Executive Learning Seminar on ‘War & Peace: The Challenges of Sovereignty’ (June 24-28, 2018). Recharge at Pardes in Israel for 5 days and immerse in luxurious learning, both inside and outside of the classroom, with the world-class Pardes Faculty. Find out more and book at pardes.org.il/executive.
You can also join us for a fabulous summer of immersive learning, with 2, 3 and 5-week options. Limited grants available for student leaders, young Jewish communal professionals, and others. Click here or contact haley@pardes.org for more information.


Summer Internship In Israel

Boost your career with a top quality internship program in Israel. Intern at one of the country’s best companies and organizations with Top Israel Interns. Stay for a semester, or just for the summer. Get trendy apartment accommodation in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv, career advancement programming, tours of the country and more. Scholarships of up to $4500 available!  http://www.topisraelinterns.com

You can find the list here:

https://jobmob.co.il/blog/internships-in-israel


 

Holocaust Remembrance Day 2023

Holocaust Remembrance Day 2023

In their research on listening to survivors of the Holocaust and other genocides, Bronwen E. Low and Emmanuelle Sonntag note listeners’ problematic tendencies towards one of two responses.  On the one hand, they can regard the narratives as so unfamiliar and foreign that they must be pushed away as overwhelming, untouchable, and inaccessible.  On the other, the stories can be seen as familiar, to the point that the listener cannot separate their own experiences and emotional response from what they take in.

But another, preferable response exists: Roger I. Simon and Claudia Eppert talk about a “chain of testimony” and suggest that listening imposes a duty on the listener.  Listening to personal testimony at the crossroads of memory and history “imposes particular obligations on those called to receive it – obligations imbued with the exigencies of justice, compassion, and hope that define the horizon for a world yet to be realized.”  In this way, bearing witness and listening to testimony demands a number of actions and responses, including that we “transport and translate stories of past injustices beyond their moment of telling by taking these stories to another time and space where they become available to be heard or seen.”

If we take Simon and Eppert’s charge seriously, as I believe we should, those of us who have been privileged to hear the direct testimony of survivors of the Holocaust.  Their words come not just with the specific knowledge they impart or the emotional impact they have on us – sorrow, anger, fear, horror – but with a duty, an obligation of some kind.  

On many of our campuses, this week is Holocaust Education Week, and this Friday marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day.  Given the significant number of Holocaust survivors and their descendants in Canada, the scheduled events and programs have a personal resonance for many of our students and their families, but their impact can be deep and meaningful for all of us, regardless of who we are and where we come from.  I encourage each of you to make time to participate in this week’s activities and to consider your place in the chain of testimony: what obligation does listening to narratives from the Holocaust place on you, and how do you carry those stories forward in time?

 

Weekly D’var: Shemot

Weekly D’var: Shemot

In this week’s parashah we learn the story of Moses, from his birth, through his flight from and eventual return to Egypt, to the acceptance of his role as leader of the Hebrew people.

After fleeing Egypt, for killing an Egyptian slave master, Moses was living rather peacefully as a shepherd in the land of Midian. The Torah describes for us Moses’s first interaction with G-d upon coming across a bush, “burning with a heart of fire [Exodus 3:3]”. G-d calls out to Moses and requests he take the Jewish people out of Egypt and eventually into the land of Israel. However, Moses argues with G-d, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh? Who am I that I should take the Jews out of Egypt? [Exodus 3:11]” After initially refusing four times, Moses eventually agrees to G-ds request, and as we know, the rest is history. But why was Moses so unwilling to take up the position of leader, to the extent that he would argue with G-d? And why was G-d so set on having Moses lead the Jewish people? 

Perhaps the answer can be found through the incident that led to his flight from Egypt, years earlier, when Moses, as mentioned above, killed an Egyptian slave master for beating a Hebrew slave. Immediately, he was met with opposition from some of the Hebrew slaves, “who made you chief and ruler over us? Do you mean to kill me as you killed the Egyptian? [Exodus 2:14]” Moses felt discouraged and unsure of his ability to lead. However, it seems that G-d saw in Moses, a faithful shepherd, the ability to lead his people from slavery to freedom. Very often in Tanakh, the people that are most worthy to lead are the ones who deny that they are worthy at all. Moses may not appear to be the first choice for a leadership figure, suffering from a speech impediment and lacking charisma; however, Moses possessed certain qualities that made him the ideal leader to bring the Jewish people out of Egypt. We too possess qualities that can lead us to achieve incredible success and realize our full potential. We may often feel unmotivated or unsure of our own capabilities. Instead of feeling discouraged, I believe we can look to Moses who, despite all his doubts, stepped up to the challenge and became the greatest leader in Jewish history. 

Sam Virine
VP of Jewish Life at Hillel Waterloo & Laurier

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