Hillel is There for Me: In Person or Online

by | Mar 30, 2020 | Hillel Ontario

Being alone and isolated in quarantine has been challenging and difficult for many. But no matter where they are – whether in person or online – Hillel will be there to support our Jewish students and provide a sense of community. For many, Hillel’s programming and engagement has been a light of hope and provided a sense of continuity even after the semester ended so abruptly.

Read below to hear how Jewish students in Ontario are coping with self-isolation and connecting with one another virtually during this time.

Guelph Hillel

Hillel at home has been central to my COVID-19 isolation! Whenever I am bored or need friendly faces to speak to, there is always some sort of “event” or zoom chat going on to brighten my day.Jessica Pink

As difficult as it is to have a sudden abrupt ending to the school year, Hillel has been the one thing constant in my life. Despite the physical isolation, the social togetherness is present. Through zoom calls to catch up with friends, movie nights, book club and more, the feeling of the Hillel community remains present. I am grateful for the Hillel community and for trying to create a sense of normality in these uncertain times. – Dana Aronowitz

The COVID-19 pandemic and concern about health and welfare has increased fear and anxiety. Engaging in community and social events has been an important aspect of my university experience. Through these trying times, Hillel has provided a positive connection through virtual gatherings that have encouraged camaraderie and collaboration that has deepened my spirituality.Sophia Cherniak

Hillel UofT

At first, I thought Talmud and Tea was not going to continue online; I initially wondered, who would want to study Talmud in their spare time when the entire world seems to be in flux? Yet, I got messages from friends asking me to teach; they wanted some continuity and Torah wisdom in their lives right now. I feel really blessed to be a part of this Hillel community where people voluntarily choose to make space for Torah, a Torah that is relevant to our current experiences. I hope we can have many more moments of togetherness in the near future.Sofia Freudenstein

Western Hillel

Even from home, Hillel’s online presence has encouraged me to continue exploring my own Jewish identity – from Instagram cooking tutorials to Facebook watch Havdalah services. Student leaders have also been there for me by reaching out to make sure I am doing well under these tough circumstances. Hillel’s support and implementation of new events have better helped me cope with self-isolating due to COVID-19.Jackson Posner

Hillel Ryerson

These past few weeks have not been easy, however, the Hillel staff have been amazing in coordinating online versions of the weekly activities we would be having if we were still on campus. They have even been gracious enough to have even more activities to bring us together like “virtual coffee hour” and multiple “virtual lunches in the loft”. I am extremely grateful for the Hillel staff and their motivation to engage us in these tough times. They have made my days much more eventful and enjoyable.Brandon Baum, 

Hillel has been a great light for me during these dark and hard times. After the suspension of all in person activities, the Hillel staff posted on social media to let us know that they will always be there for us to talk, and also created virtual events! This is something so meaningful for me, because it goes to show how much of an effort is coming from them to help our community.Nicky Polansky

Hillel York

It’s in uncertain times like these where I truly appreciate Hillel and the support and distraction it has given me as I’m stuck at home. Having something as simple as a zoom call with a staff member shows me that I have someone I can talk to. They also hosted an amazing “Coffee Home” on zoom with lots of other students. Hillel is providing me the ability to still connect with others while I am social distancing at home. Even though I miss seeing people face to face, I still feel a part of Hillel. I love how I get to interact with them online, whether it’s through their cooking videos, workout workshops, and even their March Madness Brackets competitions! They have given me something to look forward to during this difficult time and I couldn’t be more grateful!Leah Goldschmidt

Over the span of the last two weeks, Hillel has been running so many virtual programs which is really making this process not just easier but a lot more fun. The other night they held “Coffee Home”, a coffee house zoom event where we all shared a coffee and I got to watch all my talented friends perform. It is so fun to see everyone on, even if it is on zoom, we get to be together while we’re all stuck, quarantined in our own homes. Everything they are doing on Instagram is keeping me entertained during these boring weeks, like their cooking segments, workout tips, and Instagram activities we get to do! Hillel has really been active with students, making this whole situation so much more enjoyable for myself and my peers during this isolating time.Shira Gabriel

Hillel has provided me with a sense of community that I am missing during this period of physical isolation. With Instagram challenges, Instagrams stories, Zoom calls and even leading Instagram live dance classes, I am feeling that connection to community. Hillel is my happy place on campus and has been my happy place during this time.Ilana Lazar

Holocaust Remembrance Day 2023

Holocaust Remembrance Day 2023

In their research on listening to survivors of the Holocaust and other genocides, Bronwen E. Low and Emmanuelle Sonntag note listeners’ problematic tendencies towards one of two responses.  On the one hand, they can regard the narratives as so unfamiliar and foreign that they must be pushed away as overwhelming, untouchable, and inaccessible.  On the other, the stories can be seen as familiar, to the point that the listener cannot separate their own experiences and emotional response from what they take in.

But another, preferable response exists: Roger I. Simon and Claudia Eppert talk about a “chain of testimony” and suggest that listening imposes a duty on the listener.  Listening to personal testimony at the crossroads of memory and history “imposes particular obligations on those called to receive it – obligations imbued with the exigencies of justice, compassion, and hope that define the horizon for a world yet to be realized.”  In this way, bearing witness and listening to testimony demands a number of actions and responses, including that we “transport and translate stories of past injustices beyond their moment of telling by taking these stories to another time and space where they become available to be heard or seen.”

If we take Simon and Eppert’s charge seriously, as I believe we should, those of us who have been privileged to hear the direct testimony of survivors of the Holocaust.  Their words come not just with the specific knowledge they impart or the emotional impact they have on us – sorrow, anger, fear, horror – but with a duty, an obligation of some kind.  

On many of our campuses, this week is Holocaust Education Week, and this Friday marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day.  Given the significant number of Holocaust survivors and their descendants in Canada, the scheduled events and programs have a personal resonance for many of our students and their families, but their impact can be deep and meaningful for all of us, regardless of who we are and where we come from.  I encourage each of you to make time to participate in this week’s activities and to consider your place in the chain of testimony: what obligation does listening to narratives from the Holocaust place on you, and how do you carry those stories forward in time?

 

Weekly D’var: Shemot

Weekly D’var: Shemot

In this week’s parashah we learn the story of Moses, from his birth, through his flight from and eventual return to Egypt, to the acceptance of his role as leader of the Hebrew people.

After fleeing Egypt, for killing an Egyptian slave master, Moses was living rather peacefully as a shepherd in the land of Midian. The Torah describes for us Moses’s first interaction with G-d upon coming across a bush, “burning with a heart of fire [Exodus 3:3]”. G-d calls out to Moses and requests he take the Jewish people out of Egypt and eventually into the land of Israel. However, Moses argues with G-d, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh? Who am I that I should take the Jews out of Egypt? [Exodus 3:11]” After initially refusing four times, Moses eventually agrees to G-ds request, and as we know, the rest is history. But why was Moses so unwilling to take up the position of leader, to the extent that he would argue with G-d? And why was G-d so set on having Moses lead the Jewish people? 

Perhaps the answer can be found through the incident that led to his flight from Egypt, years earlier, when Moses, as mentioned above, killed an Egyptian slave master for beating a Hebrew slave. Immediately, he was met with opposition from some of the Hebrew slaves, “who made you chief and ruler over us? Do you mean to kill me as you killed the Egyptian? [Exodus 2:14]” Moses felt discouraged and unsure of his ability to lead. However, it seems that G-d saw in Moses, a faithful shepherd, the ability to lead his people from slavery to freedom. Very often in Tanakh, the people that are most worthy to lead are the ones who deny that they are worthy at all. Moses may not appear to be the first choice for a leadership figure, suffering from a speech impediment and lacking charisma; however, Moses possessed certain qualities that made him the ideal leader to bring the Jewish people out of Egypt. We too possess qualities that can lead us to achieve incredible success and realize our full potential. We may often feel unmotivated or unsure of our own capabilities. Instead of feeling discouraged, I believe we can look to Moses who, despite all his doubts, stepped up to the challenge and became the greatest leader in Jewish history. 

Sam Virine
VP of Jewish Life at Hillel Waterloo & Laurier

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